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Award-winning mining museum set to re-open

Published March 28, 2022 9.31am


A popular mining museum attraction in County Durham is set to re-open for the new season following its winter break.

Killhope2022

Killhope Lead Mining Museum re-opens on Friday 1 April.

Killhope Lead Mining Museum, in Bishop Auckland, is a multi-award winning 19th century museum in the centre of the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), where visitors can experience the life and work of the lead mining families.

The centre, which is run by us, will re-open to the public for 2022 on Friday 1 April, ahead of the Easter holidays. Admission is free and the museum will once again be offering a diverse events programme, including its blacksmith workshops and demonstrations.

Fascinating heritage of county 

Cllr Elizabeth Scott, our Cabinet member for economy and partnerships, said: "Killhope is a fantastic day out for people of all ages, with various different activities and attractions available at the museum.

"It is the type of attraction that is integral to our bid to be named UK City of Culture 2025, having reached the final four of the competition. Harnessing the fascinating heritage of County Durham and showcasing our extensive cultural offering to residents and visitors alike is one of the things that we do best."

Famous for its iconic working waterwheel, Killhope offers a stunning landscape, the Vug artwork installation which displays interesting minerals and strange formations found underground, scenic walks and amazing wildlife - including red squirrels. Visitors can also accompany one of the centre's guides on an unforgettable underground mine tour.

Engaging attraction 

In November 2021, VisitEngland awarded Killhope a Best Told Story accolade for the exciting and engaging way it tells the story of what life was like for lead mining families in the 19th century.

Find out more information on Killhope